Compact & Quick License States for Travel Nurses

October 9th, 2018 | Posted by bbarr in Licensure Information, Travel Nursing, Traveler Tips

In this post, we break down the difference between:

  1. Compact License States
  2. Easy Licensure & Walk Through States
  3. Submit Without a License States
  4. Hard to Secure States

There are some “givens” when preparing for a travel nurse assignment. Basic Joint Commission requirements for travel nurse hospital contracts include:

  • Current certifications
  • All current licensure
  • Driver’s license
  • Flu shot records
  • Immunizations
  • Physical
  • PPD/TB test
  • SSN/Passport
  • TB mask fit test

A key part of the contract process is providing the necessary licensure. The requirements vary from state to state and knowing which states are compact or the best for your investment is important information when preparing for your next assignment.

Compact License States

Having a multi-state nursing license means your information, such as work history and specialty, is stored in a shared database accessible by all of the nursing compact states. A compact license reduces the hassle of having to apply for a new license every time you travel to a new state. A knowledgeable recruiter knows which states allow a compact license.

West

  • Arizona
  • Colorado
  • Idaho
  • Montana
  • New Mexico
  • Utah

Midwest

  • Iowa
  • Missouri
  • Nebraska
  • North Dakota
  • South Dakota
  • Texas
  • Wisconsin

South

  • Arkansas
  • Kentucky
  • Mississippi
  • North Carolina
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Virginia

Northeast

  • Delaware
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • New Hampshire
  • Rhode Island

Easy Licensure & Walk Through States

With compactor or walk through states, you can get licensed in two weeks or less, and some even afford the ability to submit without having a license.

  • Alabama
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • Connecticut
  • Hawaii
  • Iowa
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Nevada
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

Submit Without a License States

  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Iowa
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Mexico
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Vermont
  • Washington
  • Washington D.C.
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

 

In some states, it can take close to six months to secure a license, so plan accordingly if you have a hard to secure state on your bucket list. Also, remember to check expiration dates on your important pieces of documentation before you take off for your travel nurse assignment.

 

We’re here to help you navigate the licensure waters

Check out our Video Guide to Compact and Quick Licensure States as well as our Licensure Guide for Travel Nurses for even more information.

 

Need a recruiter to walk you through the process? PPR has you covered. Contact us today.

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